Saturday, August 3, 2013

Thursday, March 7, 2013

Lyme disease and bee stings

Last year after feeling really crummy for several months, I was diagnosed with Lyme. I never had the first stage symptoms of rash and flu like symptoms. I do believe that my antibodies from being stung by bees regularly had something to do with my somewhat resistance to the bacteria.

One of the alments from the Lyme is my knees, especially my right one, becomes irritated and burns. It feels swollen, but never appears to be. Today while working bees for the first time this year, I was stung on my right knee. How did she know? It feels like more of a reaction then I usually get. Somehow I believe that the sting was beneficial and will help keep me feel less stress in my knee during swarm season

Ill report back and tell you my findings if apitherapy.

Saturday, March 2, 2013

There is no one answer



Having a good time at the Oracle beekeeping conference, but wish I had a fellow ATL beekeeper here.

Instructors here seem to think defend that bees can just completely take care of themselves. Most speakers here don't live in a warm climate like ours. Small cell, zero chemicals and space management seem to be the only excepted topic at this conference for pests. Several times small hive beetles have come up from students, and they just get shut down. I won't even mention the thoughts on mites. It is stated, by Dee Lusby, that the bees here ARE NOT Africanized at all, since it's not a tropical climate. No documents were show to back that up. My family lives in AZ and I can assure you that their experience says otherwise. Most of the speakers are from much colder climate then ours and still shut the conversation down every time. I believe that being a southern, city beekeeper has lots a layers of un-natural circumstances. Lots of compost piles, herbicides, pesticides, neighboring hives that are mismanaged make the SHB invasion much harder for the bees to handle. Space management is the first line of defense, but in my experience, it's not enough anymore.

Sent from Cassandra's iPhone

Friday, July 27, 2012

External Nest

I thought I had seen about all things bee. Today at a client's house I got to see an external nest. It was very cool, but there is no way they will last the winter. If they weren't 40' up a tree and 5' out on a branch I would sure try.

click on picture to get a better view.

Sunday, July 22, 2012

Bee Stings

I get asked a lot about what to put or do about bee stings. Personally I don't have a swelling reaction anymore, but it does still ouch when I'm getting punctured by the sting. Today my son, who has been quite a few times before, got stung and had a strong emotional reaction to the sting. I googled homeopathic remedies for bee stings and came up with this site. Good breakdown of the different needs for treating the sting. I gave him aconitum. It seems to be working, if only as a placebo.

Bee sting remedies

Sunday, June 24, 2012

SHB options

With the warmer weather, I'm really seeing the SHB populations rise in weaker hives. Even the strong hive have quite a few, but are keeping them at bay.





Here are some options with links with dealing with SHB issues.

SHB information

Don's method boric acid

Cheap Bottom Board traps This requires completely taking hive apart to install/change and remove.

Freeman beetle traps expensive

AJ Beetle Eaters works, inexpensive, but is messy and hard to install and remove without spilling.

Entrance traps These look like a good option. No leveling of hive necessary!

Keeping your hive real estate in correct proportion is the best method, but if you have a compost pile or more shade then sun, mechanical SHB removal is a must.